Thursday, January 31, 2013

Friday Fictioneers - TEMPTATION

It's Friday Fictioneer day which means writers from around the globe are writing 100-word flash fiction stories based on the same photo prompt. This week's photo convinced me to have a conversation between two Greek Gods. (Photo and art compliments of Claire Fuller.)


TEMPTATION
By Beth Carter

Apollo buried his angular nose in Athena’s soft curls and sighed.

“What scent is that? Lilac? Honeysuckle? Rose?” He inhaled again.

Athena shook her long locks and cocked her head toward the yellow bottle.

“It’s a secret formula apparently made from Norwegian wildflowers. The shampoo is magical. That’s all I can tell you.”

Apollo grunted. “Why?”

“Zeus told me we’d be mere bedrock if—”

“Rubbish. He exaggerates. Don’t believe those silly mythological tales.”

Apollo drew a small heart where he planned to etch their initials. Unable to resist, he again smelled Athena’s fragrant hair. They both turned to stone.

Try it! Please comment here then post your story at http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2013/01/30/1-february-2013/

43 comments:

  1. Intriguing. Curious to understand more.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, storiedimpressions. Late last night, I changed the title from "Shampoo" to "Temptation." That help explains the story, I think. Basically, Athena may enjoy the amazing fragrance of the magical shampoo IF she and Apollo don't overindulge. If they do...

      Delete
  2. I love the idea of magical shampoo that turns you to stone! also, very clever how you incorporated the heart into this story. Lovely writing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for your nice comments, EL Appleby. I try to incorporate as many prompt pieces as I can.

      Delete
  3. It's interesting how different the story ideas are that come from these photo prompts. I never would have come up with this!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, Sharon. It's crazy how everyone's mind works--and beautiful--and chilling and, and, and.

      Delete
  4. I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who came up with a mythological idea! The only thing I would change is: Artemis is Apollo's twin sister - perhaps you meant Apollo? Otherwise, I loved the story, especially the part of "Don't believe such foolish mythological nonsense."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sarah, thanks for pointing that out! I changed Artemis to Apollo (the God I had planned to use to begin with and switched last minute). I mixed up my Greek Gods! It has been a loooong time since that mythology class in high school.

      Thanks for your comments and I'm heading over to yours!

      Delete
  5. Intriguing story. I like the Greek mythology angle. I'm here: http://readinpleasure.wordpress.com/2013/02/01/fridayfictioneers-janus

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Readingpleasure. I'll read yours.

      Delete
  6. That was a lovely Greek tragedy; I like the idea of a magical shampoo. Well done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, my first attempt at a Greek tragedy. Thank you, Sandra.

      Maybe I'll have a magical shampoo in my next childten's book!

      Delete
  7. I see it's not only people who don't listen. Also very Garden-of-Eden-like. I like your descriptions, too.

    janet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Janet. The Garden of Eden was in the back of my mind when I wrote this.

      Delete
  8. I hope the magical shampoo in your children's story doesn't change people to stone. Good story--this prompt really does lend itself to retelling the adventures of mythological gods.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, no. I wouldn't scare the little ones. I agree, it's a great prompt for those attractive, mythical Greek gods. Thanks.

      Delete
  9. I really enjoyed this, and just like I used to tell ma when I was a little boy - shampoo can be the death of you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, t. And did your mom buy that? Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  10. Very clever, and well developed.
    Seems Greek mythology is all the rage these days.
    Did a very tongue-in-cheek piece on Halcyon only a couple of days ago.
    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Guess I'm hip with the Greek tragedy. I'll look for your story.

      Delete
  11. Zeus is a very jealous god. Initially, I thought there must be an aphrodisiac in the shampoo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooh. An aphrodisiac would have taken this is an entirely different direction. Thanks, Russell.

      Delete
  12. That was cute. Loved the ending. I never got into mythology, but really enjoyed that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had a literature class in high school that covered Greek mythology. Loved it. Thanks, Shirley.

      Delete
  13. What a shame and her hair was looking so good too! I'd like to see if it has thickening powers and I promise Zeus I won't say a single word. Thanks,Beth!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha. Need some thickening powers, do you? If only I could bottle and sell that! Thanks.

      Delete
  14. Dear Beth,
    This story kind of made me think about a scene from South Pacific. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zzu8ZxBHMWk
    Although Athena's way of washing Apollo out of her hair was a bit more drastic.
    Fun piece,
    Shalom,
    Rochelle

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Rochelle. Guess I should watch that classic movie some day.

      Delete
  15. Dear Beth,

    I like the way you incorporated the mallet into your story. I could see it all happening before my eyes. Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That means a lot, Doug. Thanks much.

      .Aloha

      Delete
  16. Ah, to sad when lovers turn to stone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, indeed. Temptation got them.

      Delete
  17. Another clever twist on the classical. The sculpture invites it. I couldn't resist either! Ann Isik (http://annisik51.wordpress.com)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ann.Yes, it does invite the classics. I'll hop over to yours soon.

      Delete
  18. Ah, a little touch of original sin, nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's right and thank you. I'll look for yours.

      Delete
  19. Beth,
    Nice work...Enjoyed this!

    Tom

    ReplyDelete
  20. Nice! Let's see, Athena never was very interested in fooling around, so maybe she was just as well pleased to turn to stone if it stopped Apollo from being a pest...
    Anyway, it's a very original take on the prompt, and I like the dialog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Guess she just wanted to get him out of her hair! Thank you.

      Delete